ScanSpeak Projects
Copyright 2010 Troels Gravesen

ScanSpeak Ellam Discovery 15

This small 5" doesn't go particularly low, but what it does, it does very well indeed. Very articulate (high Qm) and it doesn't die out at low levels as experienced many times before with overly damped drivers.
The midbass' coated glass fiber cone is fairly rigid and has en excellent midrange transparency and the minor equalisation around 5 kHz provides a perfect LR2 roll-off profile. The midbass will play well up into the treble area and it's better be good not to add any harshness to the treble range. And it doesn't.
As always, the ScanSpeak ring radiator delivers a smooth treble with lots of detail and low distortion. Connected to my main system, this small 2-way may seriously challenge much more expensive speakers.


ScanSpeak Ellam 9800 mkII

This speaker has been on my to-do list for along time. The first Ellam 98 dates back to 2005 (can't believe it) and was designed around the common 2nd/3rd order filter as needed when drivers are placed on a flat baffle and the need to compensate for the lack of time-alignment. Placing the 15W driver some 20 mm in front of the 9800 tweeter allows a time- and phase-coherent system based on an LR2 filter improving mid-tweeter integration and overall sense of transparency.
The 9800 dome is not particularly cheap, but to my ears it's the best alu dome ever made and seriously rival the much more expensive beryllium domes.


ScanSpeak Discovery 3-Way Classic

This speaker has been on my to-do list for a long time! So long that the ScanSpeak Discovery series wasn't developed yet. What I had in mind was the ScanSpeak Classic series from 22W, 13M and maybe the 9500 tweeter. However, the 13M drivers are no longer available and with current range of Discovery midrange drivers I don't miss them.
When I launched the SEAS 3-Way Classic I never expected this speaker to be built in any major number due to the classic Seventies design. However, builders response proved me wrong.
This ScanSpeak 3-way Discovery features an all-LR2 filter from a stepped baffle and delivers an excellent level of transparency. The midrange and tweeter levels can be adjusted to personal taste by attenuation resistors. Small 4" midrange drivers always sounds different from the common "6+1" set-up due to better dispersion in upper-mid, thus some adjustments can be necessary depending on personal taste, your room and not least source of music and amplifiers.


Discovery W18

V3 crossover: Making the stepped baffle and implementing a true LR2 filter made a world of a difference. Suddenly music started flowing and sense of depth and perspective improved vastly. I never heard the difference between a flat baffle/2nd-3rd order crossover and a stepped baffle/true LR2 filter so clearly. It's night and day. It also made me think I have to do the Ellam XT once more with an easy stepped baffle because people continue building the Ellam XT speaker rather than the much better Ellam FLEX with its more complex front panel layout. There are more to be gained from these Ellam XT. And I would love to do the 9800 tweeter again in such set-up... well, well, back to the Discovery here. Check it out by clicking link above.


Ellam FLEX 3W 

3-way from 22W/4851T00, 15W/8530K00, D3004/660000 and three other tweeters:
R3004/662000, D2604/833000 and R2604/833000

Extend your Ellam FLEX with a bass module and experience a full-blown 3-way having a significant soundstage from a modest footprint.


Ellam FLEX

2-way mini from 15W/8530K00 and four tweeter options:
D3004/660000, R3004/662000, D2604/833000 and R2604/833000

Ellam Flex is just what the name suggests, flexible. The idea is to make a small two-way from the venerable 15W/8530K00 - still the best 5" I know of - as an upgrade/replacement to former Ellam 9800, Ellam XT and W1500/97 constructions. These constructions will disappear from my website as I think I can do better today with all experiences gained over the last eight years, not least the Jenzen speakers. This also means that there will be lesser-budget versions with the R2604/833000 and D2604/833000 tweeters.


Illumina-66

2-way floorstander from ScanSpeak 18WU/4741T00 + D3004/660000 or R3004/662000

Simply the best "6+1" 2-way floorstander I've made yet. 
These 18WU drivers deliver bass like an 8-inch without loosing grip of upper mid.


Jenzen Illuminator
3-way TL design from ScanSpeak W26/8861T00, 18WU/8741-T00 and D3004/660000

Several months of work went into this design and it's so far the biggest ScanSpeak construction I've ever made. The Jenzen Illuminator features a stepped front panel to smooth midrange frequency response and to provide acoustical alignment of drivers for implementation of true LR2 crossovers. A simplified crossover can be realised with enhanced transparency and timbre quality.


Illuminator Monitor
18WU/8741T00 + D2904/710003

Explore the world of ScanSpeak Illuminator series and a fancy crossover design providing smooth mid/tweeter integration. Don't expect earthquake levels from a 20 liter monitor but be prepared to enjoyable hours with your favorite music played at sensible levels. The best small "6+1" I've made so far. Not cheap, but far less than a similar commercial design would cost.


STUDIO 101
ScanSpeak 18W/8542-00 + SEAS 27TFFC tweeter

What makes a "studio monitor" different to any other "hifi" loudspeaker? Well, a true studio monitor is supposed to have a reasonably flat on-axis response combined with an even power response, allowing studio engineers to make the best possible mix of the recording before the final master. But shouldn't all speakers be suitable for this? I guess the term "studio monitor" was derived from well engineered speakers in contrast to most home audio speakers a few decades ago, when domestic speakers certainly was a mixed blessing of drivers balanced by a few measurements and or by the ear alone.

I had great expectations from this monitor due to the long-fibre paper pulp cone and I wasn't disapointed. Click heading or image to read more.


Jensen
ScanSpeak 26W/8861T00 + 18W/8531G00 + D2905/9900

This project started with Steen writing he'd acquired 2 x 26W/8861T00 bass drivers and after the usual some 20+ mails, the top part of this big 3-way became the 18W/8531G00 for mid and D2905/9900 for treble due to another diy'er giving up his project. Not a bad choice! The 18W/8531G00 can go low in a suitable top cabinet and possibly a simple crossover could be implemented to mate bass and mid.
I never had the opportunity to do a crossover for the 9900, and having read on the web that this tweeter was a tough one, I never applied for those second hand samples available from time to time. The 9900 measures excellent and modelling the crossover was even easier. So far, this tweeter looks easy. Click heading or image to read more.


SP44
ScanSpeak 18W/8531-G00 + Accuton C244-8 + HIQUPHON OWI

I always liked the SP38/13 and seeing the large ScanSpeak D3806/8200 dome getting out of stock here and there, John/US came in handy with a pair of Accuton C244-8 inverted domes and a pair of HIQUPHON OWI tweeters as well, thus the SP44 project was on track. We could also call it Ekta-Accu, but SP44 it will be. Comparing SP44 to the Ekta is obvious and despite not having them side by side, I'm afraid the SP44 will beat the Ekta from a less coloured upper mid/lower treble. These ceramic domes are something.

Now, what can the C44 do the D3806 can't? Well, it goes deeper and it goes higher and it has a remarkable flat response all up to 20 kHz where a serious cone break-up occurs. 20 kHz is really high and nothing to worry about in a 3-way system. The C44 is not particularly sensitive, around 85-86 dB/2.8 volts - but all the same a good match to the 18W/8531 driver that usually can be tuned to a system sensitivity of 86 dB/2.8 volts. Looking at C44 horizontal dispersion, 6 kHz seems like a good starting point for crossing over to the tweeter, thus the C44 is really able to handle all of the important treble range, because we can go even lower compared to the D3806. From simulation 900 Hz looks ideal, but no guarantee this will also sonically make the best transition to the 18W midbass. Has to be tried.


Ekta Grande
2 x Scan-Speak 18W/8531-G00 + 12M/4631-G00 + D2904/7000
Project 2007-14

This speaker is heavy and I do not have a large photo studio, hence some white sheets and two lamps in my workshop. I hope it provides an impression of the sculptural beauty of Jesper's latest creation, the Ekta Grande.
This construction will be rather quick and dirty. Most of what can be said about the SS drivers can be found in the Ekta and SP38 files. The basic cabinet coordinates can be found below and to make the crossover work properly, the front panel dimensions and driver placement must be kept fairly accurate. What's behind the drivers is up to you.
The bass cabinet is 65 litres and this speaker goes low, really low.


Compact Studio Monitor speaker
Project 2008-14
Compact Studio Monitor
ScanSpeak 18W/8545-K00 + R2604/832000


Click heading or any image

Why build small speakers when we can have bigger sound for the same money from a bigger cabinet? Well, the answer is simple: Because sometimes they must to be small due to how they will fit in with a given idea about how our living rooms are going to look. WAF is high from small speakers. Even if a slim floorstander doesn't not take more floor space compared to a mini on a stand, the WAF is higher for the latter. Not much we can do about it.


Ekta
Scan-Speak 18W/8531-G00 + 12M/4631-G00 + D2904/7000
Project 2005-14

The sliced paper driver 18W/8531-G00 is a driver you don't easily get over with. It's got the best bass from any 6-7" midbass I have ever experienced. It did great in the SP95 set-up. It did even better in the SP38 construction and here's the best I have ever heard from this driver and probably due to the cabinet made from curved and laminated side panels producing the most rigid enclosure I have tested. Thanks to Jesper who came along with this construction.
Un-coated paper cones will always leave a fingerprint on the reproduced sound and the sliced paper drivers are no exception from this rule. Having a 6-7" un-treated paper cone handling a very wide frequency range in a two-way construction is tough. It helped a lot taking the first point of crossover down to 1600 Hz by the D3806/8200 tweeter and here we have the option 2 again from my thoughts about various ways of designing 2- and 3-way speakers with regard to the chosen points of crossover:
http://www.troelsgravesen.dk/Design_criteria.htm
After doing the 3-way Zahra:
http://www.troelsgravesen.dk/8543.htm, I was happy repeating this approach and in particular with drivers I knew from other constructions. I've made a crossover for a construction including the coated version of the 12M middriver (not published - and shall not) and it did very well here despite having to mate two dedicated 8" bass drivers at around 450 Hz. Not my favourite set-up, but this was how the cards were played from the constructor.


"Sliced Paper" SP38/13
ScanSpeak 18W/8531G00 + ScanSpeak D3806/8200 + ScanSpeak D2010/8513
Construction made 2004-5

Why yet another 18W/8531G00 sliced paper construction? Didn't the SP95 and the SP98 do well? Why possibly a reduced cabinet volume? And why does USXX predict an optimum 22 litre cab for the 18W driver? Who is USXX and what has LspCAD to do with this? Well, first of all, this construction dates back to the SP95 where I tried the Scan-Speak D3806/8200 mid-dome from 1600 Hz and the HIQUPHON OWI on top from 13 kHz. Click heading to read more.


"Sliced Paper" SP95
ScanSpeak 18W/8531G00 + ScanSpeak D2905/9500
Construction made 2004.

The 18W/8531-G00 driver had long been on my wish list. Everything about this driver looks good. The TS data suggest impressive bass performance and the response curves do not appear to have any serious break-ups as seen from so many other drivers. A slightly elevated SPL response from 1 - 8 (!) kHz should be easy to control in the crossover. Has Scan-Speak really succeeded in making a non-coated paper cone with these properties? The bass from the SP95 set-up by far supersedes the bass from the 2.5 clone 18W/8535-00 driver in terms of depth and low-end resolution.
Series and parallel crossovers were constructed to gain similar frequency response and to compare performance of the two speakers. The sonic impact of the two filters on the resulting sound was rather confusing.


Ellam d'Appolito
Ellam spin-off, 2006-2009

Doing the Ellam 9800 and Ellam XT speakers, the idea of making a d'Appolito construction obviously came to mind. The Ellam25, 2-way, came first and for some time I've had the Ellam d'Appolito on my website as an experimental set-up. Eventually Jesper (Ekta and Ekta Grande constructions) came by, bringing in a finished Ellam d'Appolito, thus the old file has been updated with new pics and measurements and a slightly fine-tuned crossover, now for the XT25TG-30-04 tweeter.